archive-cr.com » CR » G » GREENNOISE.CR

Total: 158

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Creating a safe passage for jaguars now and into the future | GreenNoise – Spreading the Voice of Nature
    the future June 20 2013 by Panthera Costa Rica Panthera is working in 13 of the 18 Latin American countries that are home to the jaguar documenting their presence and their main prey analyzing the threats and assuring their survival in the Jaguar Conservation Units and dispersal corridors Field validation protocols are being developed to verify the use of potential corridors evaluate prey availability measure patterns of human use of the various areas and identify future threats Based on this information corridor limits are determined and detailed plans are designed to ensure their functionality Working closely with government agencies NGOs and local partners farmers indigenous groups development associations teachers community leaders etc these plans are incorporated into land use planning strategies ensuring that these corridors remain intact Because most of the jaguar corridors exist outside of protected areas the long term preservation of connectivity depends on the understanding and cooperation of the local population Jaguars are an important part of healthy functioning ecosystems their conservation will help ensure the natural heritage of all countries that are in its distribution maintaining a great cultural icon for generations to come Category GNJaguar 0 Comment s SIGN UP FOR NEWSLETTER email Categories GN

    Original URL path: http://greennoise.cr/2013/06/20/creating-a-safe-passage-for-jaguars-now-and-into-the-future/ (2014-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • A biological corridor and a long-term commitment to conservation | GreenNoise – Spreading the Voice of Nature
    long term commitment to conservation June 7 2013 by Panthera Costa Rica In 2000 new information on jaguars surprised felid biologists detailed genetic analyses indicated that there were no subspecies of jaguars Jaguars are the same whether they live in Mexico or Argentina There is no other large wide ranging carnivore in the world with this characteristic genetic continuity throughout its existing range and although Latin America is experiencing one of the highest deforestation rates in the world there are still natural corridors in protected and unprotected areas that jaguars use to travel between populations Because genetic isolation is one of the causes of species extinctions it is essential to identify and protect these corridors ensuring the future survival of the species This convergence of information led Panthera s CEO Alan Rabinowitz to the creation of the Jaguar Corridor Initiative JCI a model of comprehensive conservation that is the defining mandate for Panthera The JCI seeks to preserve both core jaguar populations and habitat connectivity by identifying and protecting the genetic pathways existing between the northern and southern ends of its range Category GNJaguar 0 Comment s SIGN UP FOR NEWSLETTER email Categories GN 80 GN Sessions 231 GNJaguar 81

    Original URL path: http://greennoise.cr/2013/06/07/a-biological-corridor-and-a-long-term-commitment-to-conservation/ (2014-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The Jaguar, king of the Neotropical forests | GreenNoise – Spreading the Voice of Nature
    onca is the largest wild cat in the Western Hemisphere and the third largest in the world It is an emblematic species both from the cultural and ecological standpoint This cat plays a very important role in different cultures being related to power life and fertility likewise its presence in the forest is a good indicator of ecosystem health Despite its wide distribution jaguar habitat has declined by over 40 since the beginning of last century Forest fragmentation and persistent persecution by humans to jaguars and their prey are the main threats to the feline However there are still significant forest areas for the jaguar where their core populations can thrive sites called Jaguar Conservation Units Panthera is working to connect these populations creating the world s largest genetic corridor for a wild species In Costa Rica the jaguar was originally located across the country but now has a very restricted distribution wich makes it particularly vulnerable There core population areas are the Guanacaste Mountain Range the Central Volcanic Mountain Range the Talamanca Mountain Range the Osa Peninsula and the Caribbean North Northern Lowlands Learn more about this species and help save its populations http www panthera org species jaguar

    Original URL path: http://greennoise.cr/2013/06/01/the-jaguar-king-of-the-neotropical-forests/ (2014-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • A crucial commitment to protect jaguars | GreenNoise – Spreading the Voice of Nature
    the world s leading wild cat conservation organization Through this agreement is officially recognized in the country s Jaguar Corridor Initiative committing both parties to carry out scientific and conservation initiatives that help to preserve the largest feline in the Americas which is in danger of extinction This represents the fourth MOU that Panthera has signed with a Latin American government and once executed will allow Panthera to better implement a connect and protect strategy that links and allows safe passage for jaguar populations throughout the species range from northern Mexico through the heart of Costa Rica to Argentina said Rabinowitz Minister Castro said Costa Rica is a fundamental part of the jaguar corridor through the management of protected areas and biological corridors that connect to Nicaragua in the north and Panama to the south Since 2008 Panthera has worked with the National System of Conservation Areas of Costa Rica SINAC and other partners to research the status of jaguar populations in protected areas and assess the threats they face Panthera s efforts are a winning conservation strategy not only for jaguars but also for the thousands of other animal and plant species with which they share their homes including

    Original URL path: http://greennoise.cr/2013/05/16/a-crucial-commitment-to-protect-jaguars/ (2014-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Panthera Costa Rica | GreenNoise – Spreading the Voice of Nature | Page 2
    GN Sessions 231 GNJaguar 81 GN 80 News 18 Press Coverage 17 GNTortuga 15 GNTiburon 1 Tags Animals 98 Water 75 GNMural 56 Forests 50 GNJaguar 46 Landscapes 42 Skies 34 Textures 21 Beaches 19 Flora 15 Learn about Panthera s work in Costa Rica May 16 2013 by Panthera Costa Rica The Jaguar Corridor Initiative April 26 2013 by Panthera Costa Rica Preserving the 37 species of wildcats worldwide

    Original URL path: http://greennoise.cr/author/panthera/page/2/ (2014-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Jaguar Rodeo | GreenNoise – Spreading the Voice of Nature
    31 2013 by Panthera Costa Rica We share with you this spot from the Laboratorio Audiovisual de Documentalismo Investigativo LAUDI of the University of Costa Rica School of Biology for Panthera Mesoamerica about the protection of jaguars in livestock farms http www youtube com watch v MM91S52CsXs Category GNJaguar 0 Comment s SIGN UP FOR NEWSLETTER email Categories GN 80 GN Sessions 231 GNJaguar 81 GNTiburon 1 GNTortuga 15 News

    Original URL path: http://greennoise.cr/2013/10/31/jaguar-rodeo/#mc_signup (2014-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The survival of large wildcats in fragmented landscapes | GreenNoise – Spreading the Voice of Nature
    recorded It is in these territories that the animals search for mates prey and space to teach their young to hunt and become independent enough to search for new territories of their own Deforestation and changes in the use of land have created fragmented landscapes withing the territories of these wildcats in which one can find grass fields for cattle farms forest plantations or fields of oil palms sugar cane rice pineapple and other crops It is important to mention that inside of these areas there are patches of secondary forests that are interconnected with riparian woodlands belonging to rivers and streams Furthermore the presence of humans in these landscapes has created pressure on the populations of the animals that big cats hunt for prey like peccaries white tailed deer and pacas in particular All of these things have resulted in nationwide instances of large wildcats entering farms or rural communities and feed on the domestic animals they find there This in turn has create another large threat to big cats being killed by humans for the damage caused to their livestock and pets There is an on going nation conservation strategy from various organizations to minimize this impact and

    Original URL path: http://greennoise.cr/2013/10/31/the-survival-of-large-wildcats-in-fragmented-landscapes/#mc_signup (2014-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Curubanda: Avoiding an extintion! | GreenNoise – Spreading the Voice of Nature
    avoided and instead food is offered to the Jaguar The aim now is to determine if her malnutrition is caused by her inability to catch preys or by a disease that may need immediate attention Fortunately the hungry Jaguar takes only ten minutes to devour the meat provided by the caretakers Her feces the next day show normal appearance and therefore a good omen of health From that day until now CURABANDA Jaguar Panther onca who s age is calculated to be between 9 to 11 months has shown a normal appetite and has been fed according to her needs Additional to her diet a multivitamin supplement is provided to restore her to her normal weight What led CURUBANDA to this chicken coop and why was she so weak and emaciated What future did she have Could she return to the wild or should she be kept in captivity with a better quality of life and fewer risks These are the questions we ask ourselves every single day As humans and professionals we want to provide for her as best we can For years we have heard similar stories about the big cats jaguars and pumas attacking domestic animals in homes and farms Cows calves horses sheep and even pet dogs right next to the homes are often attacked by these felines as they are often forced to search for easier prey Sometimes their actions are caused by lack of food a reduction of their natural prey in the forest other times the cats are old wounded or have young and cannot hunt effectively The mismanagement of livestock by farmers could also be a reason that lures the felines to the animals in the pastures When this occurs people generally want to killed them because they consider them to be wild and dangerous animals and they want to avoid the economic loss of the killed livestock Whatever the reason the fact is that today their ventures into human territory are one of the main problems that threaten the extinction of these animals This we assume was the luck of Curabanda s mother who might have been killed which then left her fend for herself at an early age Unfortunately for the most part she seems to have failed to capture her own prey Normally the offspring of the big cats live up to a year and a half even 2 years with their mothers as they learn to hunt on their own or carve out a territory of their own Once she recovered clinical veterinary and biological examinations with the collaboration of the Veterinary School and Jaguar Program ICOMVIS of National University were performed as part of our internal protocol and considering the option to release her to its natural habitat monitoring by a radio collared Unfortunately a series of observations have revealed that she has a vision problem reason why she is not a good candidate for re introduction into her natural environment especially since she is also shy

    Original URL path: http://greennoise.cr/2013/07/10/curubanda-avoiding-an-extintion/ (2014-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive