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  • Swinging From Treetops in the Jungles of Costa Rica
    Community Ocean View Villa Furnished Home with Views prev next TicoNET Real Estate Costa Rica Real Estate Outdoors Swinging From Treetops in the Jungles of Costa Rica By Gerald Eskenazi The New York Times August 2 1998 There are countries made for hiking and some made for fishing But in Costa Rica the paradigm of an ecologically concerned nation you can scamper over the jungle treetops tethered to the world s highest clothesline More than two thirds of this Central American country is protected by law from harvesting or cutting or otherwise insulting the land So what do you do about the cloud forest which perpetually hides most of the sky Simple at least to Rodrigo Carazo one of this country s former Presidents He constructed a sort of sky hiking among the treetops in that verdant place You look at and travel over the land from above It is called a Canopy Adventure and you are part of the panorama This is not a passive activity You are working the rope and you are controlling your speed Read more about Costa Rica Copyright 1998 The New York Times Company Real Estate Information Buying a Business in Costa Rica Buying

    Original URL path: http://www.ticonet.co.cr/costa-rica/readings/980802.html (2015-06-03)
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  • Costa Rica lures Intel & Microsoft
    from office is unlikely to slow the interest in new investments Though the president s earlier moves to pare down state spending were immensely unpopular Mr Figueres s push for technology investments has received widespread support Miguel Angel Rodriguez Costa Rica s next president and a member of the opposition Christian Social Unity Party criticized some of Mr Figueres s spending cuts But he has also publicly supported the technology strategy That strategy emerged in part after the Costa Rican Investment and Trade Development Board or Cinde urged the government to avoid a scattershot way of attracting investment to a developing nation and suggested focusing on a sector in which Costa Rica had a competitive advantage ECONOMIST S THEORIES Brizio Biondi Morra director of Incae a top Latin American business school outside San Jose suggested that Cinde and government officials talk to economist Michael Porter who teaches at Harvard Business School Mr Biondi Morra who attended Harvard Business School considers Mr Porter his mentor and is a believer in Mr Porter s theories that the focused development of industrial clusters can spur faster and more sustainable economic growth Soon Mr Porter had the ear of Mr Figueres and Incae had founded the Latin American Center for Competitiveness and Sustainable Development to promote the same ideas Now Central America s presidents meet every six months to discuss how to develop investment clusters individually and as a region Mr Figueres asked Cinde for help in persuading a high profile technology company to invest Cinde representatives called hundreds of U S technology companies In October 1995 they got a lead Intel the world s largest maker of computer chips wanted to build a new chip assembly and testing plant Mr Figueres and Cinde shifted into overdrive with Cinde officials going to Mr Porter s office in Cambridge Mass for last minute advice on one of their first presentations to Intel They discovered that we had planned some preliminary visits to places like Mexico Brazil and Chile recalls Bill Calder an Intel spokesman So they convinced us that on the way to Brazil we should make a quick stop in Costa Rica CUMBERSOME BUREAUCRACY Intel was initially reluctant The big negative was that it was still a very small country and we were concerned that we d overwhelm them says Chuck Pawlak who was Intel s point man in negotiations with Costa Rica as director of real estate and site selection Also among Intel s concerns says Mr Calder were Costa Rica s often cumbersome bureaucracy and to a lesser degree high wages compared with other developing nations Mr Figueres would be putting notes into his computer when we spoke to him in his office says Mr Pawlak We ve been to many countries where the top officials have never had a computer in their life Costa Rican officials cut no deals for Intel that they couldn t also arrange for other foreign companies looking to set up shop according to an independent report

    Original URL path: http://www.ticonet.co.cr/costa-rica/readings/980402.html (2015-06-03)
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  • Costa Rica, Naturally
    Fully Titled Beachfront Villa Home in Gated Community Ocean View Villa Furnished Home with Views prev next TicoNET Real Estate Costa Rica Real Estate Spring and Summer Cruises Costa Rica Naturally By John Tierney The New York Times February 1 1998 THE brochure made it sound simple and appealing explore Costa Rica s rain forests from a cruise ship that reaches pristine coasts normally accessible only by grueling overland treks But I headed for the jungle with trepidation This was after all an eco tour from which there was no escape And it was in a country that by setting aside more than a quarter of its land in nature preserves has become Mecca for the ecologically correct The prospect of being trapped with a boatload of devout pilgrims worshiping trees and flagellating themselves for humanity s environmental sins brought to mind the comedian Carol Leifer s warning about cruises If you thought you don t like people on land Read more about Costa Rica John Tierney is a staff writer for The New York Times Magazine Copyright 1998 The New York Times Company Real Estate Information Buying a Business in Costa Rica Buying Building Legal Tips Tricks and Traps

    Original URL path: http://www.ticonet.co.cr/costa-rica/readings/980201.html (2015-06-03)
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  • Costa Rica
    its course the northern mountains are grouped into the Guanacaste Tilarán and Central Cordilleras rising up to 11 322 feet 3 440 meters Some of the volcanoes that help to make up these Cordilleras are still active Poás Volcano at 8 900 feet 2 705 meters has what some specialists consider to be the largest volcanic crater in the world Irazú Volcano at 11 322 feet 3 440 meters and Arenal Volcano at 5 358 feet 1 635 meters both also active put on fiery shows from time to time Continuing further south towards Panamá we enter the impressive Talamanca Cordillera This volcanic cordillera holds the highest peak of the country Cerro Chirripó at 12 532 feet 3 820 meters Chirripó also has the lowest temperatures of the country they may vary from 80º F to 30º F at nighttime Running throughout most of the country s surface rivers and waterways form a complex network that provides the country with fresh water and hydraulic power all year round and with enough to spare to export to neighbouring countries Large rivers such as the Reventazón Térraba and Tempisque are scarce due to the small size of the country but that doesn t stop whitewater rafting and kayaking from being highly popular sports Costa Rica s rivers are well known in the boating community Costa Rica has two coastlines one bordering the Caribbean Sea Atlantic Ocean another bordering the Pacific Ocean The Atlantic Coastline is a flat and regular lowland about 125 miles 210 km long The Pacific Coast instead is over 630 miles 1 016 km long characterized by irregular and rocky headlands It has two deep bays formed by the Nicoya Peninsula to the north and the Osa Peninsula to the South Most of the islands of Costa Rica are in the Pacific Ocean but both oceans are equally rich when it comes to marine and coastal life We must mention Isla del Coco a 24 square km island lying some 500 km off the coastline in the Pacific ocean well known for the legends it has inspired buried pirate treasures and the incredible richness of its associated marine flora and fauna This is Costa Rica s only oceanic island and it has been declared a National Park to protect its still untouched natural resources and habitats Government Armed forces as an institution were abolished in Costa Rica in 1949 Instead Costa Rica has Civil Rural and Municipal Guards for internal security services To many this is the secret to Costa Rica s peace and democracy But the true reason may well be that the country s power structure is built in such a way that it doesn t allow any one person or group to acquire and maintain too much control over national affairs Costa Rica is regulated by the Constitution of the 7th of November 1949 the same document that abolished the army and which still prevents abuse of power by a strong president National power is divided among three branches the executive the legislative and the judicial powers Executive power is wielded by the president of the country assisted by two vice presidents and a cabinet of 18 Ministers They are elected every four years and may not be re elected for a second term Although this council is where most of the country s power lies many actions require the support of the Legislative Assembly The Assembly holds legislative power it may amend the president s budget and it holds the right to appoint the Republic s comptroller or contralor who checks on public expenditures and controls executive actions related to the national budget If a two thirds majority of the Assembly votes against presidential decisions they will be overturned the Assembly is also the country s only institution with the power to declare war The Legislative Assembly is formed of 57 members known also as deputies democratically elected from the country s seven provinces The number of deputies from a province varies depending on the province s population Judicial power lies with the Supreme Court Its members known as magistrates are assigned by the Legislative Assembly for 8 year terms and they may serve two terms unless voted out of office by the Assembly The Supreme Court also embraces 100 lower civil and criminal courts whose judges are assigned by the magistrates Constitutional reviews by the courts are important and have helped keep presidential power under control Costa Rica s government structure has what may be called a fourth power It is known as the Electoral Tribunal and it is in charge of overseeing elections every four years It is staffed by three magistrates assigned by the Supreme Court and six substitutes who are independent of the government The existence of this tribunal reflects how important clean elections are for Costa Ricans It must also be noted that although people are serious about electing a new president February often turns into a big joyful fiesta every four years People begin to wave their flags everywhere they go honk their horns and invent songs and jokes to deliver as they walk on the streets strewing confetti These activities are carefully overseen by the Electoral Tribunal to ensure a peaceful electoral process the oversight process also ensures democracy and fairness since it is involved with every phase of the process from registering voters all citizens over 18 years old to controlling political advertising to avoid political smear campaigns campaign planning setting the actual election date usually every four years on the first Sunday of February and vote counting Costa Rica is divided into seven provinces which in turn are subdivided into 81 cantones or counties and these into 429 districts Each province is headed by a governor appointed by the executive power Districts are ruled by local governments known as municipalidades They are headed by a munícipe whose election depends on the percentage of votes obtained by each political party every four years Municipal councils have limited powers and their decisions do not affect national policy Nevertheless they are becoming increasingly aware of how much their actions bring about national implications and thus governors and community leaders organize themselves to demand for financial support Health care education and social welfare programs embrace most citizens The provision of these basic rights is managed by well established institutions such as the Caja Costarricense del Seguro Social social security the Instituto Nacional de Seguros insurance institute and a strong educational system led by the Ministry of Education that receives 23 percent of the national budget The quality of education and health care is a matter of constant debate in many sectors of the country Bureaucracy and corruption among the highest levels of government may be found especially since the government is large relative to the size of the country Despite several challenges faced by the government Costa Rican citizens enjoy equality before the law the rights of petition assembly and freedom of speech Costa Rica is a true democratic Republic in which the lack of centralized power has built a democracy with outstanding results History When thinking of Costa Rica different images from those generated for the rest of Central America come to mind History itself has made this country a different place to live The first people to inhabit this land were the Chorotegas originally from what we today know as Mexico and the Chibchas a Colombian native nation Both pre Columbian populations brought their own culture and life to a land naturally diverse The Chorotegas inhabited Guanacaste and the Nicoya Península The Chibchas first migrated to the South Pacific and then divided into clans that spread onto different areas There were also important migrations from the jungles of Brazil and Ecuador to the lowland jungles of the Costa Rican Atlantic Coast also known as Talamanca Upon the first arrival of the Spaniards 1502 the native inhabitants of Costa Rica had developed a complex social structure they had their own monetary system a ritual calendar and had developed the skill of writing But first comers were not so impressed by these achievements as they were by the gold decorations and the friendly reception provided by the native people When the Spaniards came back to colonize the area they encountered a different situation The jungle was hostile to the invaders tropical diseases were impossible to handle there was no sign of gold mines and most of all the native peoples did not surrender easily but rather fought back fiercely Colonization was finally accomplished by the Spaniards in 1562 when Juan Vásquez de Coronado founded Cartago in the central highlands instead of attempting to colonize the coastal areas This colony was different from Spanish colonies anywhere else the native population was so small that there was little chance to form the mestizo culture so common among other colonies It also meant that the workforce available to Spaniards was smaller The treasures Spaniards expected to find in this rich land turned out to be very scarce Hence this area was effectively forgotten for many years Furthermore no new colonies were established in Costa Rica until 1717 when Heredia was founded Then San José followed 1737 and later Alajuela 1782 By 1800 only 50 000 people lived in the entire country A change was urgently needed if Costa Rica was to grow and become a Republic This change was provided by the independence movement In 1821 Costa Rica tardily received the news that Central American colonies had declared independence from Spain But being an independent country was no easy task and cooperation was required Thus the Central American Federation was created 1823 as a means to facilitate the region s efforts towards sucessful independence In 1838 the union fell apart and Costa Rica declared its own independence continuing to see itself as a separate country ever since History shows that democracy became the sole ruler of Costa Rica after its declaration of indpendence There have been though few breaks in the country s democracy One of them is Braulio Carrillo s dictatorship 1835 1842 As the elected president of the newly formed country Carrillo imposed his decisions and suppressed any opposition to his will Even now Costa Ricans resent his dictatorship But his time in office brought about good signs also he organized the country s political system and encouraged people to produce coffee Thanks to this initiative and the region s soil and climate ideal conditions Costa Rica increased coffee exports and became more economically secure In 1842 Carrillo was forced from power by Francisco Morazón and his party who then became the new president But Costa Ricans were not pleased with his efforts to reestablish the Federation and he was executed one year later The nation s first president came into power in 1847 his name was José María Castro Madríz Coffee producers didn t find his willingness to sponsor freedom of press meaningful and by 1849 Costa Rica had a new president Juan Rafael Mora a member of the new coffe aristocracy He is well known for his opposition 1856 to William Walker a Yankee adventurer who tried to conquer Costa Rica and enslave its inhabitants In April 1870 General Tomás Guardia overthrew the government and served for 12 years During this time he managed to use coffee earnings and taxations to finance public investments such as roads and buildings By making primary education free and obliglatory for both sexes he helped improve the population s awareness on the political process of the nation In 1889 the Costa Ricans finally witnessed the country s first steps towards democracy President Bernardo Soto called for elections with popular participation although women and blacks were still excluded After this election new presidents kept trying to amend the Constitution to continue their rule or to impose their own choice for president but the country remained at peace until democracy faced a new challenge in 1919 Federico Tinoco the nation s Minister of War at the time formed a dictatorship that overthrew the elected president Alfredo González Flores But costarricans had already accepted liberty as their form of life and were not willing to give it up Due to their opposition Tinoco was exiled by 1919 From here there follows a tranquile series of administrations destroyed only by 1930 s Depression National efforts didn t accomplish much and unemployment low salaries and poor working conditions remained as a result of an old fashioned partenalistic state In 1940 Costa Rica s constitution underwent new reforms still effective sponsored by Rafael Angel Calderón Guardia Such reforms established worker s rights to organize social security and minimum wage standards Calderón was succeeded in 1944 by Teodoro Picado In 1948 Costa Rica s democracy was put on hold again José Figueres Ferrer opposed outgoing president Teodoro Picado who was supported by Calderón because he refused to hand power over to president elect Otilio Ulate Blanco As a result a civil war broke out After several weeks of fighting Figueres and his forces emerged victorious Two thousand people were killed during the 1948 Civil War but their deaths brought about political changes that still are of great importance to Costa Rica In fact a new political constitution was drafted after the war a task undertaken by an interim government represented by Figueres himself This new constitution became a turning point in Costa Rica s history since it abolished the armed forces as a permanent institution Costa Rica s democracy makes it a beautiful place to live in but the absence of an army makes its beauty unique incomparable The dissolution of the army was only one among many other outstanding acts the constitution also established a neutral electoral tribunal allowed women blacks and everyone over 18 to vote and prohibited presidents from running for successive terms Over the following 40 years these reforms were continued and extended due to Costa Rica s awareness of the importance of building a free country The lack of an army has led to larger investments on educational health care and ecological programs In 1987 president Oscar Arias was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to spread peace and democracy throughout Central America Democracy and peace Costa Rica s traditional ways of life have helped the development of environmental consciousness and measures for environmental protection Recently Costa Rica signed an historic new agreement by which the country will be responsible for the maintenance of forest vegetation which will help to clean the air polluted by industry in other countries Industry The issue here is not quantity but variety An agricultural economy prevails in a country where land is covered by small sized family farms instead of the large one owner haciendas common in other Latin American countries Its industry ranges from gourmet coffee beans to electric power needed to get the water boiling for your mid morning coffee break and the timber to make a comfortable chair to drink it in This is the result of government s efforts to diversify the country s economy since for many years previously coffee was its only source of foreign income creating an instable economy The first coffee beans arrived from Jamaica in 1779 when the country was still a colony of Spain The coffee industry then began to grow helped by ideal coffee growing conditions a warm and mild climate fertile volcanic soils and abundant rainfall in the Meseta Central area International markets have ranked Costa Rica s coffee beans among the best in the world One third of the country s workforce is involved in coffee production Coffee exports are the most important in terms of earnings closely followed by bananas which represent 30 of the nation s income In fact Costa Rica is the second biggest exporter of bananas in the world Banana plantations began with the Boston Fruit Co today the United Fruit Company in 1870 Now over 40 000 hectares are covered by these plantations the green carpet of banana plants has become an outstanding part of the Caribbean landscape Seventy percent of agricultural land is used for cattle pasture Three quarters of Costa Rica s cattle are found in Guanacaste known as cattle country Here meat raising is common and it supplies both national consumption and international markets accounting for 9 of the country s export earnings Milk breeds are raised mostly in the high mountains of the Central Valley The dairy industry is highly developed with new technology is being implemented every year Sugar cane has also aided the country s economy while cocoa is grown in the Atlantic coast area and cotton grows in the northwest plains of Guanacaste Other non traditional products such as papaya sweet potatoes strawberries flowers grains and tobacco are encouraged to stabilize the country s economy in the face of variations in price or demand of any particular product The importance of manufacturing is increasing in Costa Rica Since the nation s economy is based on agricultural products food processing is currently the most important industry of this type In recent years pharmaceutical and textile exports have also risen A few years ago Costa Rica imported a number of products that it exports today Industry technology and education go hand in hand when it comes to this part of the isthmus Well trained human resources are a powerful lure for foreign investments Raw Back Draw Industry maquila has become a growing source of employment for Costa Ricans since it requires personnel specialized in high technology areas Geothermal and hydroelectric power are provided by the country s natural resources Today Costa Rica is self sufficient in electricity and has in fact become an exporter of electric power to other Central American countries Tourism seems to be becoming the nation s most important industry and ecotourism flourishes here stimulated by Costa Rica s extremely strong interest in nature conservation and environmental protection The government s efforts seem to leading the way to a responsible tourism

    Original URL path: http://www.ticonet.co.cr/costa-rica/readings/970101.html (2015-06-03)
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  • Costa Rica Marriott Hotel and Melia Playa Conchal Beach & Golf Resort, Costa Rica
    resort market took a giant step up with the opening of two new properties the colonial style Costa Rica Marriott Hotel in San Jose and the Melia Playa Conchal Beach Golf Resort Known previously for its charming country inns and eco lodges Costa Rica now also offers true luxury accommodations Grupo Sol Melia The 308 room Melia Playa Conchal has chosen the finest Pacific beach in the blossoming resort region of Guanacaste in northwest Costa Rica Its stylish accommodations comprise two story bungalows with six deluxe suites that feature a living room area and terrace Sporting options include tennis horse back riding and facilities for fishing water sports and scuba diving the much awaited par 72 Robert Trent Jones II golf course should be available early next year Guests can be taken by carts to the landscaped pool area five restaurants three bars a health club disco casino and meeting rooms for up to 350 classroom style or 600 for cocktails Also in Guanacaste Melia now operates the 54 room Sol Playa Hermosa and manages the 220 room Melia Carari Conference Center Golf Resort Call 800 336 3542 Marriott Catering to the business and leisure traveler the classy 252 room Marriott occupies a coffee plantation out side the center of San Jose The resort offers its guests a host of amenities including two pools a golf driving range tennis courts indoor health facilities a casino and a choice of three restaurants Rooms feature balconies cable TV phones modems irons and ironing boards guests on the executive floor have full concierge services are greeted with fruit baskets and are served breakfast The hotel provides conferences and groups with 13 meeting rooms and an 8 500 square foot ball room that can be subdivided into smaller sections Call 800 228 9290 Copyright

    Original URL path: http://www.ticonet.co.cr/costa-rica/readings/961205.html (2015-06-03)
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  • Intel To Add Two New Manufacturing Sites
    announced last year Intel is working with officials in both Texas and Costa Rica to obtain permits approvals for utility service and applicable economic development programs before construction can begin We believe growth of the PC industry will continue and are taking appropriate steps to make sure that Intel will be able to meet the needs of our customers Our position in the marketplace of tomorrow will be determined by the provisions we make today noted Dr Craig Barrett Intel s chief operating officer Fort Worth Texas United States Fort Worth Texas will be the site of Intel s Fab 16 the company s newest advanced logic wafer fabrication factory The first phase of the plant will be approximately 800 000 square feet in size and feature an 75 000 square foot Class 1 clean room This factory will build advanced logic products on 0 25 micron technologies and then progress to smaller geometries in the future One micron is equal to 1 1 000 000 of a meter or 1 22 400th of an inch or approximately 1 100th the thickness of a human hair The first phase Fab 16 of the Fort Worth site is projected to cost 1 3 billion U S and is scheduled to be operational by 1999 When at full capacity the plant will employ over 800 people San Jose Costa Rica A6 T6 the latest assembly test plant for Intel will be located in San Jose Costa Rica This site will initially consist of two buildings that represent 400 000 square feet of manufacturing space The site is projected to cost more than 300 million when fully operational and is expected to employ 2 000 people over the next few years The plant is scheduled to begin operations in early 1998 Shanghai China

    Original URL path: http://www.ticonet.co.cr/costa-rica/readings/961113.html (2015-06-03)
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  • A stroke of luck in Costa Rica leads to a beautiful, quiet beach
    the driver Playa Bonita when you get aboard and he ll signal when to get off I told Maclean I didn t have any colons the Costa Rican currency but he told me to just give the bus driver 1 for the two of us dollars are readily accepted in this country that has become an increasingly popular spot for retired American expatriates and everything would be fine even though that was well more than the standard fare for the trip We thanked him for his advice went up to the corner and caught the next bus after a wait of only five minutes The converted school bus was jammed and the open windows did little to mitigate the sultry heat along the banana coast on this mid November day But after a ride of only about 15 or 20 minutes the driver pulled to a stop and along with several other helpful passengers who heard us state our destination when we boarded announced that we had reached Playa Bonita The scene that greeted us as we alighted from the vehicle was perfect An open air restaurant nestled beneath a scattering of palms and deciduous trees a crescent beach and the clear aquamarine waters of the Caribbean beyond and absolutely no one in sight This was definitely my kind of beach secluded deserted no playing hopscotch through wall to wall beach towels and oiled flesh and plenty of shade from the trees and the restaurant s roof to provide respite from the strong Caribbean rays We walked into the Joy Restaurant and were greeted by Johnny Jones who owns the place with his brother The sun had crossed the proverbial yardarm so we accepted his offer of seats at the bar and a couple of frosty bottles of Imperial a popular Costa Rican beer Jones told us he had spent time working in the States but had returned to become his brother s partner in the restaurant He outlined plans for expansion of the modest restaurant and the construction of a small resort hotel on the sizeable chunk of beachfront land the brothers own Secretly I greeted the news with a twinge of regret preferring to see the place remain in its underdeveloped if not pristine state On the other hand I was only a visitor there and not trying to make a living from the place Elizabeth and I changed into our swimsuits in the restaurant s shower changing rooms and headed across the sand The water temperature was somewhere in the low 80s warm enough so we could comfortably run right in like those hard bodies in the commercials yet cool enough to be refreshing with an air temperature in the mid 90s Once in we knew we had made the right decision eschewing the organized land tours offered by the ship 30 to 70 each thank you instead seeking sun sand sea and suds the aforementioned Imperials While our shipmates were sweatily getting on and off buses

    Original URL path: http://www.ticonet.co.cr/costa-rica/readings/960304.html (2015-06-03)
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  • Americans seeking plastic surgery flock to Costa Rica
    going to Mexico Brazil Costa Rica and the Dominican Republic Today the capital of Costa Rica and Mexican cities such as Hermosillo Nogales and Tijuana are dotted with plastic surgery clinics More than a decade ago the first Americans to head to Costa Rica for surgery were Hispanics mainly Cuban Americans from South Florida The Latinos were familiar with Latino surroundings and weren t suspicious said Dr Ronald Pino King who runs a plastic surgery clinic geared to foreigners If you tell an American Go get an operation in Costa Rica he has no idea what he s getting into He thinks he ll be operated on in a hut in the jungle In fact Costa Rica is renowned for its medical system which has conducted heart kidney and liver transplants Business took off here once the lists of happy plastic surgery patients grew to include spouses of U S doctors inspiring confidence in others Just from Miami I think I ve had about 100 said apartment owner Mary Helen Phillips who rents units to patients for eight to 10 days of recovery after surgery Patients usually come in pairs or groups Sometimes sisters come together or mother and daughter or husband and wife The wife gets operated on and the husband sightsees plays golf tennis or goes fishing Pino said Some people like to combine the surgery with a Costa Rican vacation contributing to the boom here said Dr Miguel Alfaro a Costa Rican doctor who specialized in plastic surgery at the University of Colorado But Phillips noted that most come because they are alone and they are looking to win someone over Both the women and the men are looking for someone younger Some Americans also come to Costa Rica because they find surgeons here more willing than their American counterparts to take on the face the breasts and fat reduction of the stomach or hips at the same time The tradeoff though is that combining the operations entails more risk That s one of the red flags that U S plastic surgeons raise in talking about surgery abroad As you pile more and more procedures together your possibility of complications goes up said Dr Roxanne Guy chairman of the public education committee of the American Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons based in Arlington Heights Ill Those looking into going abroad should ask many questions she said What if you get into trouble where are you going to go If you got really sick who s there to respond Is there an ambulance service Or are you just going to die there She adds more questions Can you talk to anyone else who s had surgery there What is the surgical center like If they have flies in the operating room it s probably not the place you want to be said Guy who practices plastic surgery in Melbourne Fla Surgeons in Costa Rica bristle at any suggestion that their surgery may be subpar saying their popularity

    Original URL path: http://www.ticonet.co.cr/costa-rica/readings/951229.html (2015-06-03)
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